A Pioneer of social revolution: Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar

 

Vinay N. Patel

Dept. of Sociology, S.C.A. Patel Arts College Sadhli, Ta-Sinor, Dist-Vadodara-Gujarat.

*Corresponding Author Email:  

 

ABSTRACT:

Bharatha Ratna Dr. Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar, reverentially and most affectionately called ‘Babasaheb Ambedkar’occupies a prominent place in the annals of India’s social history. He determined as a fighter and a deep scholar has made significant efforts to lead the society on the path of Liberty, Equality and Fraternity. He thought that “For a successful revolution it is not enough that there is discontent. What is required is a profound and thorough conviction of the justice, necessity and importance of political and social rights.”He liked the religion that teaches liberty, equality and fraternity.

 

The present paper is an attempt to highlight Dr. Ambedkar's contribution for social revolution in India.He has not only prepared the ground for a silent revolution, but has also played a key role in the drafting of the Constitution of India which has set the terms for the development of the world largest democracy. Dr. Ambedkar, as his last message cautioned the pseudo – champions of downtrodden; I could carry on the caravan and if you could carry it forward alright? Otherwise keep it there where I put. don’t pull it back’. Today, Dr. Ambedkar is loved by all those who love untouchables and hate untouchability

 

KEYWORDS: Social revolution, Pioneer.

 

 

 


INTRODUCTION:

Bharatha Ratna Dr.Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar, reverentially and most affectionately called ‘Babasaheb Ambedkar’occupies a prominent place in the annals of India’s social history. He was a well-known politician and an eminent jurist. Ambedkar's efforts to eradicate the social evils like untouchability and caste restrictions were remarkable. He determined as a fighter and a deep scholar has made significant efforts to lead the society on the path of Liberty, Equality and Fraternity.  He laid down the foundation of concrete and sincere efforts by codifying the common Civil Code for Hindus and other sections of the Indian society. He thought that “For a successful revolution it is not enough that there is discontent. What is required is a profound and thorough conviction of the justice, necessity and importance of political and social rights.”He liked the religion that teaches liberty, equality and fraternity.

 

The present paper is an attempt to highlight Dr. Ambedkar's contribution for social revolution in India.

 

STATEMENT OF THE STUDY:

The present paper is an attempt to highlight Dr. Ambedkar's contribution for social revolution in India after independence.

 

DR. AMBEDKAR'S CONTRIBUTION FOR SOCIAL REVOLUTION:

Dr. Ambedkar analyzed Hindu society before starting his struggle againstuntouchability and the caste system. He was a scholar as much as a man ofaction – in any case before becoming one. In his writings, Ambedkar tried hardto show the mechanisms of the caste system and clarified the origin ofuntouchability in order to support his fight for equality. For him, if the lowercastes were not in a position to overthrow their oppressors, it was because oftwo reasons: they had partially internalized hierarchy; and because of the verycharacteristics of caste-based inequality. The internalization of hierarchy waslargely due to what M.N. Srinivas was to call the sanskritisation process thatAmbedkar, in fact, had identified more than 20 years before. As early as in1916, Ambedkar presented his first research paper at Columbia University andexplained that the caste system could not have been imposed by the Brahminsover society, but that it took shape when they were able to persuade othergroups that their values were universally superior and that they had to beemulated by others, including endogamy, a marital rule which closed the systemupon itself.

 

The kind of inequality inherent in the caste system is called “graded inequality”by Ambedkar in a very perceptive way. In Untouchables or the Children of theIndia’s Ghetto, he contrasts it with other varieties of inequality which werenot so difficult to abolish or correct. In the Ancient Regime, the Third Statewas able to raise itself against the aristocracy and the monarchy. In industrialsocieties, the working class can raise itself against the bourgeoisie. The typeof inequality from which the caste ridden society suffers is of a different kindbecause its logic divides the dominated groups and, therefore, prevents themfrom overthrowing the oppressor. In a society of “graded inequality”, theBahujan Samaj is divided into the lower castes (Shudras) and the Dalits andthe Shudras and the Dalits themselves are divided into many jatis. One of themain objectives of Dr. Ambedkar was first to unite the Dalits and, then, theBahujan Samaj and, second to endow them with a separate identity that wouldoffer them an alternative route out of sanskritisation. In order to achieve thistwo-fold objective, he implemented five different strategies in the course of his almost four-decade long public career.

 

Prof. A. K. Sen has also said, “Ambedkar is my Father in Economics. He is truely celebrated champion of the underprivileged. He deserves more than what he has achieved today. However he was highly controversial figure in his home country, it was not the reality. His contribution in the field of economics is marvelous and will be remembered forever..!”

Ambedkar was not only the father of Indian Constitution; he was a great freedom fighter, political leader, philosopher, thinker, economist, editor, social reformer, revivalist of Buddhism and was first Indian to break down the barriers in the way of advancement of women in India. He laid down the foundation of concrete and sincere efforts by codifying the common Civil Code for Hindus and other sections of the Indian society. He stated that women should be given all round development, more importantly social education, their well-being and socio-cultural rights. He emphasized that each and every section of Indian women be given their due share and it is a must to maintain and protect dignity and modesty of women (Shukla 2011).

 

As per the thought of Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar, “A people and their religion must be judged by social standards based on social ethics. No other standard would have any meaning if religion is held to be necessary good for the well-being of the people. Religion must mainly be a matter of principles only. It cannot be a matter of rules. The moment it degenerates into rules, it ceases to be a religion, as it kills responsibility which is an essence of the true religious act.”

 

Ambedkr’s emphasis was on reconstruction of the Hindu society on the basis of equality rather than the social reforms initiated by Brahma Samaj or Arya Samaj because their attempts were limited only to the upper strata of the society. His in depth study of Smritis and Shashtras and his experience from the response of upper castes during the temple entry movement crystallized his conclusions on Hindu philosophy and society.

 

Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar exclaimed, “Indians today are governed by two different ideologies. Their political ideal set in the preamble of the Constitution affirms a life of liberty, equality and fraternity. Their social ideal embodied in their religion denies them.”

 

CONCLUSION:

In the condolence message, on Ambedkar’s death in parliament, Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru said “Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar was a symbol of revolt against all oppressive features of Hindu society”. His dream of society, based on gender equality is yet to be realized and therefore his thoughts are important for the social reconstruction that favors women empowerment. Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar exclaimed, “An ideal society should be mobile, should be full of channels for conveying a change taking place in one part to other parts. In an ideal society there should be many interests consciously communicated and shared. Dr. Ambedkar has tried all kinds of strategies during his life for eradicatingcaste and, more especially, for emancipating the Dalit from this oppressivesocial systems. He said, “I do not want that our loyalty as Indians should be in the slightest way affected by any competitive loyalty whether that loyalty arises out of our religion, out of our culture or out of our language. I want all people to be Indians first, Indian last and nothing else but Indians.” His contribution to the making of modern India is possibly more substantial than that of any other leader of his generation. He has not only prepared the ground for a silent revolution, but has also played a key role in the drafting of the Constitution of India which has set the terms for the development of the world largest democracy. Dr. Ambedkar, as his last message cautioned the pseudo – champions ofdowntrodden; I could carry on the caravan and if you could carry itforward alright? Otherwise keep it there where I put. Don’t pull it back’. Today, Dr. Ambedkar is loved by all those who love untouchables and hateuntouchability.

 

REFERENCES:

1.   B.R. Ambedkar, “Castes in India. Their Mechanism, Genesis andDevelopment”, Indian Antiquary, May 1917, vol. 61, reproduced in Dr.Babasaheb Ambedkar Writings and Speeches, vol. 1, Bombay, Governmentof Maharashtra, 1979.

2.   Anjanikar Bhagwan. Thoughts from Siddharth College papers, Vidya Upasak Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar(trans), Nanded, Nirmal Publication, 1999, page 23

3.   Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar’s Writings and Speeches, (Trans) vol.19, Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar’s Biography meansPublishing committee, Mumbai, 2005, page 283

4.   http://social.yourstory.com/2015/04/quotes-b_r-ambedkar/

5.   https://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/ 618535.B_R_Ambedkar       

6.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/B._R._Ambedkar

7.   http://www.culturalindia.net/reformers/br-ambedkar.html

8.   https://www.facebook.com/notes/dr-bhimrao-ramji-ambedkar/dr-ambedkar-jayanti-article/420628858464/

9.   http://www.ambedkar.org/

10. http://inspire99.com/5-brilliant-quotes-and-thoughts-by-ambedkar-ambedkar-quotes-on-ambedkar-jayanti/

11. http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/b/b_r_ambedkar.html

 

 

 

Received on 19.01.2023         Modified on 25.01.2023

Accepted on 31.01.2023      ©AandV Publications All right reserved

Res.  J. Humanities and Social Sciences. 2022; 13(4):287-289.

DOI: 10.52711/2321-5828.2022.00047