Author(s): Chandni Begum, Karunesh Jha

Email(s): chandnibegum192@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/2321-5828.2024.00013   

Address: Chandni Begum1, Karunesh Jha2
1Research Scholar, Department of English, A.P.S. University, Rewa, (M.P)
2Professor and Head of English Dept., Pandit S.N. Shukla University, Shahdol, (M.P)
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 15,      Issue - 1,     Year - 2024


ABSTRACT:
This research paper focuses on identity quests in Linda Grant’s novels. This paper explores the complex web of identity development that Linda Grant's novels weave together. With an emphasis on the subtle stories that shed light on the characters' travels, the study makes its way across the tricky terrain of self-discovery found in Grant's literary works. The study deconstructs the complex layers of identity quests that Grant's protagonists undertake through a close reading of important works, such as "The Clothes on Their Backs" and "When I Lived in Modern Times." The investigation covers how the characters' perceptions of themselves are shaped by the interaction of their personal histories, cultural surroundings, and societal forces. The study explains how Grant's books function as rich canvases on which the characters paint their stories of identity by drawing on a variety of theoretical frameworks. Grant's protagonists go on significant self-discovery journeys that connect with readers universally, whether they are navigating the complexities of personal relationships, dealing with the legacy of family, or facing historical upheavals. By closely analysing narrative strategies, character growth, and thematic motifs, this study seeks to advance knowledge of how Linda Grant uses the novel to delve into the complexities of the human psyche. By doing this, it illuminates the author's unique storytelling style, in which the search for identity serves as a major theme and encourages readers to consider their own paths of self-discovery. In the end, this investigation aims to present Linda Grant's works as engrossing and perceptive analyses of the nuances present in the process of forming and describing the self.


Cite this article:
Chandni Begum, Karunesh Jha. Narrating The Self: Identity Quests in Linda Grant's Novels. Research Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. 2024;15(1)87-9. doi: 10.52711/2321-5828.2024.00013

Cite(Electronic):
Chandni Begum, Karunesh Jha. Narrating The Self: Identity Quests in Linda Grant's Novels. Research Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. 2024;15(1)87-9. doi: 10.52711/2321-5828.2024.00013   Available on: https://www.rjhssonline.com/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2024-15-1-13


REFERENCES:
1.    "Linda Grant". Themanbookerprize.com. Booker Prize Foundation. Archived from the original on 9 November 2016. Retrieved 8 November 2016.
2.    Axel Stähler, “Antisemitism and Israel in British Jewish fiction: perspectives on Clive Sinclair’s Blood Libels (1985) and Howard Jacobson’s The Finkler Question (2010)”.
3.    Beckerman, Hannah (6 November 2016). "The Dark Circle by Linda Grant review–insurrection in the sanatorium". The Observer. London. Retrieved 8 November 2016.
4.    Brah, Avtah. “Thinking through the concept of Diaspora”. The Post-Colonial Studies Reader. Ed. Bill Ashcraft et.al 2nd ed. London and New York: Routledge, 2006.443-46.
5.    Grant, Linda (2 May 2019). A Stranger City. Virago. ISBN 978-0349010502.
6.    Grant, Linda (5 November 2016). "My writing day: Linda Grant: 'I can't write after lunch, in a public place, or when anyone is in the house'". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 13 March 2017.
7.    Grant, Linda. -“When I Lived in Modern Times, London: Granta Publication, 2000.
8.    Parker, Emma (July 2008). "FEATURES: Interview with Booker-shortlisted novelist Linda Grant". le.ac.uk. University of Leicester. Retrieved 12 March 2017.
9.    Rustin, Susanna (17 January 2011). "Linda Grant: a life in writing". The Guardian. London. Retrieved 8 November 2016.
10.    Stuart Hall, “Cultural Identity and Diaspora” Contemporary Postcolonial Theory. Ed. Padmini. Mangia, Delhi: OUP,1997
11.    Suzanne Ruta, ‘The Newest Place in the World’ The New York Times, 28/01/2001, last accessed 06/02/2017.

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