Author(s): Shubha Tiwari, Sarwar Ahmad Wani

Email(s): sarwarwani890@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/2321-5828.2023.00018   

Address: Shubha Tiwari1, Sarwar Ahmad Wani2
1Professor, Department of English, A.P.S University, Rewa, (M.P) India.
2Research Scholar, Department of English, A.P.S University, Rewa (M.P) India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 14,      Issue - 2,     Year - 2023


ABSTRACT:
The degradation of land and ecosystem and its effects on humans is the biggest issue today. These issues have numerous effects on human existence, including decreased access to clean water, loss of biodiversity, food scarcity, and increased vulnerability to natural disasters. In this context, the concept of ecofeminism has gained new significance as it offers a unique perspective on the intersection of environmental issues and gender. Ecofeminism is a philosophical and social movement that recognizes the interconnectedness of the oppression of women and the degradation of the environment. Ecofeminists argue that both the exploitation of nature and the oppression of women stem from similar societal structures and belief systems that prioritize profit, power, and domination over women and the natural world. This paper attempts to study Kamala Markandaya, Nectar in a Sieve from an ecofeminist perspective and how power and dominance are themes that appear throughout this novel and have a direct impact on both the world of women and the world of Nature. The novel delves into topics such as destitution, exploitation, and the devastation of the natural world through the experiences of its female protagonist. Ecofeminism emphasizes the need for a holistic approach to environmental issues that takes into account the interconnectedness of all living beings. It recognizes the importance of preserving traditional knowledge and practices that promote sustainability and respect for nature. Additionally, ecofeminism calls for the inclusion of women in decision-making processes related to environmental issues, as they are often the ones most affected by environmental degradation.


Cite this article:
Shubha Tiwari, Sarwar Ahmad Wani. Woman as a Savior and Nurturer of Nature: An Ecofeminist Analysis of Kamala Markandaya’s Nectar in a Sieve. Research Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. 2023;14(2):89-2. doi: 10.52711/2321-5828.2023.00018

Cite(Electronic):
Shubha Tiwari, Sarwar Ahmad Wani. Woman as a Savior and Nurturer of Nature: An Ecofeminist Analysis of Kamala Markandaya’s Nectar in a Sieve. Research Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences. 2023;14(2):89-2. doi: 10.52711/2321-5828.2023.00018   Available on: https://www.rjhssonline.com/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2023-14-2-6


REFERENCES:
1.    Angom, Rebecca. Kamala Markandaya Novels: Woman Centred Perspectives and Post-Colonial Issues. New Delhi: Akansha Publishing House, 2013, print
2.    Adams, C. Neither Man nor Beast: Feminism and the Defense of Animals. New York: Continuum. 1994.
3.    Berman, T. The Rape of Mother Nature: Women in the Language of Environmental Discourse. Trumpeter. 1994.
4.    d'Eaubonne, F. What could an ecofeminist society be? (Trans Jacob Paisain). Ethics and the Environment. 1999.
5.    Gaard, G. Ecofeminism: Women, animals, nature. Philadelphia, PA: Temple University Press.1993.
6.    Krishna Rao A. V. Madhavi Menon K. Kamala Markandaya: A Critical Study of Her Novels 1954-1982. Delhi: B. R. Publishing Corporation: 2017.
7.    Markandaya, K. Nectar in a sieve. New Delhi: Penguin Books.1954.
8.    Misra, Parvati. Class Consciousness in the Novels of Kamala Markandaya. New Delhi: Atlantic Publishers, 2009.
9.    Plumwood, V. Feminism and the mastery of nature. London: Routledge. 1993.
10.    Shiva, V. Staying Alive women, ecology and survival in India. New Delhi 2010.
11.    Sarpparaje, M. “Kamala Markandaya’s ‘Nectar in a Sieve’- The Voice of the Voiceless”. Indian Scholar. ISSN 2350-109X. www.Indian scholar.co.in. 2014.
12.    Starhawak. Feminist Earth-based Spirituality and Ecofeminism. In J. Plant (Ed.), Healing the Wounds: The Promise of Ecofeminism. Philadelphia, PA: New Society 1989.
13.    Warren, J. K. (Ed.). Ecological feminism. London: Routledge.1997.

Recomonded Articles:

Author(s): Devanshu Bhadauria

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Apoorva Neral

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Arun Norge

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Dwijendra Nath Thakur

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Gholamreza Mehri

DOI: 10.5958/2321-5828.2016.00006.1         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Roshan John Joseph

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Vikas Dangi

DOI: 10.5958/2321-5828.2017.00032.8         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): R.P. Saharia

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Khushal Suryawnshi

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Praveen Rai, Sujata

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Mitike Shrivastava

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Naila Rashid, Sadaf Nasir

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Vineet Kaul

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Smita Parashar, Smriti Singh

DOI: 10.5958/2321-5828.2020.00051.0         Access: Open Access Read More

Author(s): Afa-Dul Mujiaba

DOI:         Access: Open Access Read More

Research Journal of Humanities and Social Sciences (RJHSS) is an international, peer-reviewed journal, correspondence in the fields of arts, commerce and social sciences....... Read more >>>

RNI: Not Available                     
DOI: 10.5958/2321-5828 


Recent Articles




Tags